UCLA News

Read latest UCLA News. UCLA or University of California, Los Angeles was founded in 1882 and become part of university of California in 1919. The role of UCLA is to give students basic knowledge of many wide range of subjects with chance for in-depth study in a chosen discipline. UCLA is research University, their inventions and creativity are world well known and are recognized as best public university. Here we list UCLA news from their newsroom for followed disciplines: Science and technology, health, Climate, Art and culture and Society news. The best ranked UCLA subject are: Atmospheric Science, Human Biological Sciences, Dentistry & Oral Sciences, Psychology, Computer Science & Engineering, Materials Science & Engineering, Mathematics, Earth Sciences.

Nearly half of California caregivers experienced financial stress during 2020

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In 2020, an estimated 6.7 million Californians provided care for a family member or friend with a serious or chronic illness or disability. According to a study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 44.4% of those caregivers reported experiencing some level of financial stress due to their roles, and 13.5% experienced a physical or mental health problem due to their caregiving work. In the study, which used data from the center’s 2020 California Health Interview Survey, UCLA researchers write that caregivers received little financial support for their work:…

UCLA astronomers discover more than 300 possible new exoplanets

ucla-astronomers-discover-more-than-300-possible-new-exoplanets

UCLA astronomers have identified 366 new exoplanets, thanks in large part to an algorithm developed by a UCLA postdoctoral scholar. Among their most noteworthy findings is a planetary system that comprises a star and at least two gas giant planets, each roughly the size of Saturn and located unusually close to one another. The discoveries are described in a paper published today in the Astronomical Journal. The term “exoplanets” is used to describe planets outside of our own solar system. The number of exoplanets that have been identified by astronomers…

Researchers discover an unexpected regulator of heart repair

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FINDINGS A study using mice by scientists at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA reveals that cardiac muscle cells play a pivotal role in determining how the heart heals following a heart attack.   The findings challenge a longstanding paradigm about heart repair and identify a protein that could serve as a target for drugs to treat or prevent heart failure. BACKGROUND Heart attack is the leading cause of heart failure, which kills more than 600,000 people in the U.S. each year….

Too many firefighters are dying of cancer. UCLA’s Derek Urwin aims to change that

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They’re our modern-day superheroes — charging into burning buildings without hesitation, rescuing those in peril, staving off destruction. But in risking their lives for us, firefighters pay a heavy price, with cancer rates that far outpace the public at large. Derek Urwin, a longtime firefighter who expects to complete his Ph.D. in chemistry during the winter quarter, is out to change that, using his knowledge of chemistry to improve firefighter health and safety and, ultimately, bring these cancer rates down. It’s a mission that had a very personal origin. In 2014, Urwin’s…

Farwiza Farhan wins UCLA’s Pritzker Award for environmental innovators

farwiza-farhan-wins-ucla’s-pritzker-award-for-environmental-innovators

The UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability presented the 2021 Pritzker Emerging Environmental Genius Award to Farwiza Farhan, who seeks to conserve wildlife in ways that also sustain humans living on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Farhan was honored during an online ceremony on Nov. 18. Farhan works with communities and courts to protect the Leuser Ecosystem — the last place on Earth where tigers, elephants, rhinos and orangutans live together in the wild. She founded and leads a nonprofit organization called HAkA. The name stands for Hutan, Alam dan…

Vaccinated people with breakthrough COVID infections had lower viral loads

vaccinated-people-with-breakthrough-covid-infections-had-lower-viral-loads

Vaccinated health care workers who experienced breakthrough COVID-19 infections during the winter of 2020–21 had lower viral loads than their similarly infected but unvaccinated co-workers, according to a new UCLA study. The findings, published this week in the peer-reviewed journal Open Forum Infectious Diseases, show that infected workers who were fully or even partially vaccinated with either of the two mRNA vaccines authorized for use in U.S. had less of the virus in their test samples and were therefore less likely to “shed” — or orally or nasally expel —…

Professor spotlights Black–Indigenous solidarity in new book

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With his book “An Afro-Indigenous History of the United States,” assistant professor Kyle Mays traverses broad, complex — and intimate — territory. Mays, who is Black and Saginaw Anishinaabe, teaches African American studies and American Indian studies at UCLA. His latest book is billed as the first to examine the intersecting struggles of Black and Native Americans. In it, he delves into the the country’s founding; early 20th century global reckonings with racism, like the multinational Universal Races Congress in 1911; the Black Power and Red Power movements of the…

Professor spotlights Black-Indigenous solidarity in book combining the scholarly with the personal

professor-spotlights-black-indigenous-solidarity-in-book-combining-the-scholarly-with-the-personal

With his book “An Afro-Indigenous History of the United States,” assistant professor Kyle Mays traverses broad, complex — and intimate — territory. Mays, who is Black and Saginaw Anishinaabe, teaches African American studies and American Indian studies at UCLA. His latest book is billed as the first to examine the intersecting struggles of Black and Native Americans. In it, he delves into the the country’s founding; early 20th century global reckonings with racism, like the multinational Universal Races Congress in 1911; the Black Power and Red Power movements of the…

Alumnus Rafael Agustín champions diversity in Hollywood

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When Rafael Agustín was a first-year student at the UCLA School of Theater Film and Television, it rapidly became clear that, as an immigrant from Ecuador, he would have to carve his own path to success. As an aspiring filmmaker, he recognized that not many of his fellow students or Hollywood creators looked like him or shared his background. “That’s why I became a writer,” he said. “I realized, ‘Oh, I have to write myself into existence to have a shot.’” Agustín graduated from UCLA in 2004 and went on…

UCLA scientists make strides toward an ‘off-the-shelf’ immune cell therapy for cancer

ucla-scientists-make-strides-toward-an-‘off-the-shelf’-immune-cell-therapy-for-cancer

Immunotherapies, which harness the body’s natural defenses to combat disease, have revolutionized the treatment of aggressive and deadly cancers. But often, these therapies — especially those based on immune cells — must be tailored to the individual patient, costing valuable time and pushing their price into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Now, in a study published in the journal Cell Reports Medicine, UCLA researchers report a critical step forward in the development of an “off-the-shelf” cancer immunotherapy using rare but powerful immune cells that could potentially be produced in large…

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