MIT news

Here we present MIT News and their new science discoveries .MIT was founded in 1861 and now is located in Cambridge, MA USA. They are focused on making world better place through Innovation, research and education. The mission of MIT is to improve knowledge and education for students in science, technology, medicine and other key subjects of scholarship that will best serve the nation and the world in the 21st century. The Institute is focused on producing and spreading of education that will work with others to bring their best for the world’s great challenges. MIT provides their students such education that involves hard study and real issue solving tasks. Finally every student will be developed into person that handle with real life problems be creative and effective.Read MIT News and other Universities from America

How the brain deals with uncertainty

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As we interact with the world, we are constantly presented with information that is unreliable or incomplete — from jumbled voices in a crowded room to solicitous strangers with unknown motivations. Fortunately, our brains are well equipped to evaluate the quality of the evidence we use to make decisions, usually allowing us to act deliberately, without jumping to conclusions. Now, neuroscientists at MIT’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research have homed in on key brain circuits that help guide decision-making under conditions of uncertainty. By studying how mice interpret ambiguous sensory…

Volta Labs: Improving workflows for genetic applications

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The cost of DNA sequencing has plummeted at a rate faster than Moore’s Law, opening large markets in the sequencing space. Genomics for cancer care alone is predicted to hit $23 billion by 2025, but sample preparation costs for sequencing have stagnated, causing a significant bottleneck in the space. Conventional sample preparation, converting DNA from a saliva sample, for example, into something that can be fed to a sequencing machine, relies on a liquid-handling robot. It is essentially a mechanical arm equipped with pipette tips that moves liquid samples to…

Documentary short, “The Uprising,” showcases women in science who pressed for equal rights at MIT in the 1990s

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The MIT Press today announced the digital release of “The Uprising,” a documentary short about the unprecedented behind-the-scenes effort that amassed irrefutable evidence of differential treatment of men and women on the MIT faculty in the 1990s. Directed by Ian Cheney and Sharon Shattuck, the film premiered on the MIT Press’ YouTube channel, and is now openly distributed.  A 13-minute film, “The Uprising” introduces the story behind the 1999 Study on the Status of Women Faculty in Science at MIT and its impact both at the Institute and around the globe. Featuring…

New integrative computational neuroscience center established at MIT’s McGovern Institute

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With the tools of modern neuroscience, researchers can peer into the brain with unprecedented accuracy. Recording devices listen in on the electrical conversations between neurons, picking up the voices of hundreds of cells at a time. Genetic tools allow us to focus on specific types of neurons based on their molecular signatures. Microscopes zoom in to illuminate the brain’s circuitry, capturing thousands of images of elaborately branched dendrites. Functional MRIs detect changes in blood flow to map activity within a person’s brain, generating a complete picture by compiling hundreds of…

Cellular environments shape molecular architecture

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Context matters. It’s true for many facets of life, including the tiny molecular machines that perform vital functions inside our cells. Scientists often purify cellular components, such as proteins or organelles, in order to examine them individually. However, a new study published today in the journal Nature suggests that this practice can drastically alter the components in question. The researchers devised a method to study a large, donut-shaped structure called the nuclear pore complex (NPC) directly inside cells. Their results revealed that the pore had larger dimensions than previously thought,…

Pablo Jarillo-Herrero receives Max Planck-Humboldt Research Award

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Pablo Jarillo-Herrero, the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics at MIT, has received the 2021 Max Planck-Humboldt Research Award from the Max Planck Society and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation for his work on two-dimensional quantum materials. In 2018, Jarillo-Herrero’s research group discovered that by rotating two layers of graphene by a “magic angle,” the bilayer material can be turned from a metal into an electrical insulator or even a superconductor. Max Planck Society President Martin Stratmann noted Jarillo-Herrero’s research on two-dimensional quantum materials has “opened up a new…

Punishment for the people

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By some lights, it seems curious how authoritarian leaders can sustain their public support while limiting liberties for citizens. Yes, it can be hard to overthrow an entrenched leader; that does not mean people have to like their ruling autocrats. And yet, many do. After all, authoritarian China consistently polls better on measures of trust and confidence in government than many democratic countries, including the U.S. And elected leaders from Africa to East Asia and Europe have seen their popularity rise after rolling back civil rights recently. What explains this…

MIT economist Joshua Angrist shares Nobel Prize

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Joshua Angrist, an MIT labor economist whose work has delved deeply into issues of employment and education while helping to establish empirical rigor throughout economics, has been named winner of the 2021 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel.  He shares the award with David Card of the University of California at Berkeley and Guido Imbens of the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Angrist was cited for his work establishing new methods of conducting “natural experiments” in economics — studies using datasets in which otherwise similar…

Tool for predicting pedestrian flow expands its reach

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When urban development takes place, a traffic impact assessment is often needed before a project is approved: What will happen to auto traffic if a new apartment building or business complex is constructed, or if a road is widened? On the other hand, new developments affect foot traffic as well — and yet few places study the effects of urban change on pedestrians. A group of MIT researchers wants to alter that, by developing a model of pedestrian activity that planners and city officials can use in much the same…

Enabling AI-driven health advances without sacrificing patient privacy

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There’s a lot of excitement at the intersection of artificial intelligence and health care. AI has already been used to improve disease treatment and detection, discover promising new drugs, identify links between genes and diseases, and more. By analyzing large datasets and finding patterns, virtually any new algorithm has the potential to help patients — AI researchers just need access to the right data to train and test those algorithms. Hospitals, understandably, are hesitant to share sensitive patient information with research teams. When they do share data, it’s difficult to…

Maria Zuber testifies before Congress on striking the right balance between research security and openness

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The United States must perform a careful balancing act to secure federally funded research against improper interference from China and other foreign governments without shutting down valuable international scientific research collaborations, MIT Vice President for Research Maria T. Zuber said this week in testimony before Congress. Speaking at a virtual hearing held by two subcommittees of the U.S. House Science Committee, on “Balancing Open Science and Security in the U.S. Research Enterprise,” Zuber said that both the federal government and U.S. universities have roles to play in creating a scientific…

Volpe project prepares for design phase

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Ten years into a comprehensive process to reimagine the 14-acre Volpe parcel in Kendall Square, MIT has a Cambridge-approved master plan and is preparing to advance specific design proposals for the mixed-use development. Getting to this point required extensive public review, which led to city approvals for a rezoning of the site and special permits that will govern the “look and feel” of the eight-building development. In addition to the design process, a final step in the creation of this vibrant district will be the Institute’s completion of the new…

Seven from MIT receive National Institutes of Health awards for 2021

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On Oct. 5, the National Institutes of Health announced the names of 106 scientists who have been awarded grants through the High-Risk, High-Reward Research program to advance highly innovative biomedical and behavioral research. Seven of the recipients are MIT faculty members. The High-Risk, High-Reward Research program catalyzes scientific discovery by supporting research proposals that, due to their inherent risk, may struggle in the traditional peer-review process despite their transformative potential. Program applicants are encouraged to pursue trailblazing ideas in any area of research relevant to the NIH’s mission to advance…

3 Questions: Sheena Vasquez and Christian Loyo on communicating science through poetry

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Christian Loyo of the Grossman lab and Sheena Vasquez of the Drennan lab, both graduate students in the Department of Biology, were recently selected to participate in The Poetry of Science. The project, founded by Joshua Sariñana PhD ’11, aims to advance racial justice at the intersection of science and art by bringing together Cambridge, Massachusetts-affiliated poets and scientists of color to create poems about scientific research. These poems will be on public display, along with the scientists’ portraits, at the Massachusetts General Hospital main lobby from Nov. 13 through…

Weighing cancer cells to personalize drug choices

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Researchers at MIT and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have developed a new way to determine whether individual patients will respond to a specific cancer drug or not. This kind of test could help doctors to choose alternative therapies for patients who don’t respond to the therapies normally used to treat their cancer. The new technique, which involves removing tumor cells from patients, treating the cells with a drug, and then measuring changes in the cells’ mass, could be applied to a wide variety of cancers and drug treatments, says Scott Manalis,…

School of Engineering third quarter 2021 awards

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Faculty members recognized for excellence via a diverse array of honors, grants, and prizes. School of Engineering Publication Date: October 4, 2021 Caption: Eighteen members of the MIT engineering faculty received awards in recognition of their scholarship, service, and overall excellence in the past calendar quarter. Credits: Photo: Lillie Paquette/School of Engineering Members of the MIT engineering faculty receive many awards in recognition of their scholarship, service, and overall excellence. The School of Engineering periodically recognizes their achievements by highlighting the honors, prizes, and medals won by faculty working in…

Mathematicians solve an old geometry problem on equiangular lines

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Equiangular lines are lines in space that pass through a single point, and whose pairwise angles are all equal. Picture in 2D the three diagonals of a regular hexagon, and in 3D, the six lines connecting opposite vertices of a regular icosahedron (see the figure above). Mathematicians are not limited to three dimensions, however.  “In high dimensions, things really get interesting, and the possibilities can seem limitless,” says Yufei Zhao, assistant professor of mathematics. But they aren’t limitless, according to Zhao and his team of MIT mathematicians, who sought to…

New “risk triage” platform pinpoints compounding threats to US infrastructure

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Over a 36-hour period in August, Hurricane Henri delivered record rainfall in New York City, where an aging storm-sewer system was not built to handle the deluge, resulting in street flooding. Meanwhile, an ongoing drought in California continued to overburden aquifers and extend statewide water restrictions. As climate change amplifies the frequency and intensity of extreme events in the United States and around the world, and the populations and economies they threaten grow and change, there is a critical need to make infrastructure more resilient. But how can this be…

David Julius ’77 shares the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine

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David Julius, a 1977 graduate of MIT, will share the 2021 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced this morning in Stockholm. Julius, a professor at the University of California at San Francisco, shares the prize with Ardem Patapoutian, a professor at the Scripps Research Institute, for their discoveries in how the body senses touch and temperature. Both scientists helped to answer a fundamental question regarding how the nervous system interprets our environment: How are temperature and mechanical stimuli converted into electrical impulses in…

For campus “porosity hunters,” climate resilience is the goal

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At MIT, it’s not uncommon to see groups navigating campus with smartphones and measuring devices in hand, using the Institute as a test bed for research. During one week this summer more than a dozen students, researchers, and faculty, plus an altimeter, could be seen doing just that as they traveled across MIT to measure the points of entry into campus buildings — including windows, doors, and vents — known as a building’s porosity. Why measure campus building porosity? The group was part of the MIT Porosity Hunt, a citizen-science…

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