Berkeley University News

This is Berkeley University News page. The university was found in 1868 as the University of California. They provide over 350 degree programs at fourteen colleges and schools. It is high ranked University by many ranking institutions. Berkeley University is a part of various researches and member of Mathematical Sciences Research Institute and Space Sciences Laboratory. They also are very active in sports. They poses 207 Olympic medals, where 117 are gold medals. They hold many awards such Nobel prices, Pulitzer and Academy Award winners. We present many channels of Berkeley University Science News such: art and culture, business and economy, science and environment, politics and society, mind and body, technology and engineering.

Microbes provide sustainable hydrocarbons for petrochemical industry

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Researchers from UC Berkeley and the NSF Center for Sustainable Polymers have developed a chemical technology that combines fermentation and chemical refining (center panels) to produce petroleum-like liquids (right) from renewable plants (left). (Image by John Beumer, courtesy of NSF Center for Sustainable Polymers) If the petrochemical industry is ever to wean itself off oil and gas, it has to find sustainably-sourced chemicals that slip effortlessly into existing processes for making products such as fuels, lubricants and plastics. Making those chemicals biologically is the obvious option, but microbial products are…

For some, an MRI can be risky. This nuclear engineer has a solution.

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The first use of MRI to scan a patient’s body was in 1977.  Today, more than 40 million MRI scans are carried out every year in the U.S.  In about one out of three, patients get an infusion containing the metal gadolinium as a contrast agent to improve imaging. But over the last 10 to 15 years, physicians have increasingly reported that contrast MRIs sometimes lead to potentially life-threatening complications, particularly in patients with certain types of kidney disease.  The FDA issued a warning against contrast MRIs for patients with…

Taliban gunshots echo through Khwaga Ghani’s new life at Berkeley

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After the fall of Kabul, it took Khwaga Ghani and some members of her family nearly two months to escape Afghanistan and make their way to California. She is the first fellow in an ambitious program, co-sponsored by UC Berkeley, to support Afghan refugees — and she’s already thinking about how she can get back to Kabul to continue her work as a journalist. (Photo by Brittany Hosea-Small) On a cool autumn morning in the East Bay, a morning of ragged clouds and shifting light, Khwaga Ghani is at a…

What it takes to eat a poisonous butterfly

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Where monarch butterflies overwinter by the thousands to millions (left, a cluster in California), the black-headed grosbeak (right) is one of few birds that can eat them without vomiting. Researchers discovered that the bird has evolved similar genetic mutations as those found in the monarch that allow both to handle milkweed toxins, which accumulate in the butterfly and are deterrents to most predators. (Photos courtesy of Mark Chappell, UC Riverside) Monarch butterflies and their close relatives thrive on poisonous milkweed, thanks to genetic mutations that block the effects of the…

Berkeley Talks: Scholars on new book, ‘Atmospheres of Violence’

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Read the transcript. Subscribe to Berkeley Talks, a Berkeley News podcast that features lectures and conversations at UC Berkeley. Review us on Apple Podcasts. Eric Stanley is an associate professor in UC Berkeley’s Department of Gender and Women’s Studies and author of the new book, Atmospheres of Violence. (Othering & Belonging Institute photo) In Berkeley Talks episode 128, a panel of artists, organizers and academics discuss UC Berkeley professor Eric Stanley’s 2021 book, Atmospheres of Violence: Structuring Antagonism and the Trans/Queer Ungovernable, which interrogates why, in a time when LGBT rights are advancing in…

Kamala Harris’ residence to display Jewish mezuzah from UC Berkeley

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Magnes museum registrar Julie Franklin holds the mezuzah that will soon be in the vice presidential residence. A mezuzah is one of the items that “make a Jewish home Jewish,” says a Berkeley scholar. (UC Berkeley photo by Neil Freese) A sacred Jewish object called a mezuzah that is in the collection of UC Berkeley’s Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life will soon be hung in the official Washington, D.C., residence of Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband, Doug Emhoff. Emhoff, who is the first Jew to live…

When ecology meets art, you get a dating site for trees

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“Joshua trees in soil fungi at high elevation.” (Artwork by Juniper Harrower; made with acrylic, alcohol, Joshua tree seed oil, Joshua tree fibers and Joshua tree roots) In 2015, as a Ph.D. student at UC Santa Cruz, Juniper Harrower was planning to go back to Costa Rica, where she’d been working in the cloud forests to study patterns of forest regeneration. But then she learned something — something heart-wrenching — that would change the path of her research. Juniper Harrower, a first-year Masters of Fine Arts student in the Department…

CRISPR scientists grapple with the ethics, expectations of gene editing

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A new paper in the journal Ethics and Human Research co-authored by Berkeley Public Health Professor of Bioethics and Medical Humanities Jodi Halpern and Lecturer Sharon E. O’Hara, among others, explores how scientists perceive the potential of CRISPR technology and how the transition of many researchers from bench science (making new discoveries in the lab) to translational science (using these new discoveries to create novel medical treatments) may affect the treatment of those with genetic conditions. CRISPR, which stands for “clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats,” is a genome editing…

Professor Peter Nelson adds wildland firefighting to his expertise

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“I’m learning as much about the practice of fire and prescribed burning as I can, wherever I can get it,” says Peter Nelson, a California Native American who joined the faculty in January 2021. He is training to be a wildland firefighter with the goal of using “good fire” as a tool to reduce risk and build ecosystem resilience against wildfires. (Photo by Brittany Hosea-Small) For Peter Nelson, stepping foot on the UC Berkeley campus last January as a new faculty member, after 3 1/2 years on the San Diego…

L’Oréal fellow Lilia Xie expresses herself through materials chemistry

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2021 L’Oréal For Women in Science fellow Lilia Xie discusses her research on new materials. (Video courtesy of L’Oréal USA) Lilia Xie, a UC Berkeley postdoctoral fellow, finds she is able to express her individuality as much through materials chemistry as through her flute. “Once you master the basics, you can start asking the question, ‘How can I change this to make it more interesting?’” she said. “As a materials chemist, I am trying to discover something that can improve the electronics of the future. It’s … really fun to…

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